Look for the Meteor Storm

All TAA member; Next Friday night, May 23, our planet will pass through the debris trail of comet 209P/LINEAR as we discussed at our last meeting. Here is more info about the event. Remember that we will have a club observing party at the APO for this event. Bring you lawn chairs, binoculars and scopes to observe some Messier objects and this meteor shower.

The comet was discovered in February of 2004 by the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Project (LINEAR). The comet is a very small periodic comet that circles our sun once every five years. The debris trails that will cause this meteor shower are from the comet crossing our path in 1898-1919.

comet-LINEAR-meteor-shower-orbit

Simulation by NASA/JPL/HORIZON

The best (predicted time) to view the event in California will be between 11:20 pm to 1:20 am (6 to 8 UT). When you watch the YouTube video, notice the predicted peak for the Western United States. The predicted  peak in our area will be about 12:20 am. Keep in mind that all times and even the event itself is only a prediction. This is a new shower and nobody knows how strong it will be. Because it is new, hopes are high that it will be one for the record books. The word “New” meaning, the Earth has never passed through this debris field before. Chances are good to see some big meteors and maybe even some fireballs.

The Earth as seen from coming 209p-ids meteors (RA=122.8�, Dec=+79.0�)during the peak at 7:21 UT 24 May. Red line shows the border of hemisphere where the Moon is above horizon (it is shown with in the corner of the Fig. 5 according to its phase).

Image via meteor scientist Mikhail Maslov of Russia.

 

The Earth as seen from coming 209p-ids meteors (RA=122.8�, Dec=+79.0�)during the peak at 7:21 UT 24 May. Red line shows the border of hemisphere where the Moon is above horizon (it is shown with in the corner of the Fig. 5 according to its phase).

 

 

Here is how the constellation will look at 11:30 pm. The radiant should come from the Giraffe’s  upper body area. As the night progresses, the giraffe’s tail will swing counter clockwise.

Camelopardalis

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Author


Greg Eckes

President

I am a retired music teacher. I make custom violins and violas. I play violin in the Tulare County Symphony and fiddle in the Tule River Bluegrass Band. I like camping and astronomy.

One thought on “Look for the Meteor Storm

  1. Deva-Denise May 13, 2014 at 9:43 pm

    This would be an excellent time to put the camera out for some long exposure shots. Time to get that camera out Greg and give it a try.

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